Michigan Wolverine Recruiting: Alex Malzone and His Arm


Posted at 5:30pm — 7/16/2014

Michigan Wolverine Recruiting: Alex Malzone and His Arm

Go back and watch the film of Alex Malzone. The author classifies him as a short- armer, but of a little different nature. He does take the ball back quite a bit in his arm swing. That is probably the “flaw” that Dilfer is referring to. The author tenders another potential hypothesis: Malzone may be very flexible, and that extra distance achieved may be able to increase his velocity. It may also increase error with ball release point; it may not.

Alex Malzone 2The verdict here is that Alex Malzone is not a reconstruction project, that is, his motion path and release points do not need major work. Dilfer never really stated Malzone is a project. But it is clear that Dilfer likes certain mechanical intricacies, or else commentary about change originates from what he considers improper, hence the baseball remark. It is not even remotely known whether or not Coach Nussmeirer shares Dilfer’s assessment or how he plans to develop/change Malzone’s arm slot. Coach will probably worry about that next year; he currently has many other hot pans on the offensive stove.

Should Alex Malzone quit baseball and hence undertake Dilfer’s assessment of stopping the reinforcement of the baseball throwing motion? Dilfer never said to quit baseball, but his comments beg this question.

Alex Malzone 3The muscle patterns used are somewhat dissimilar due to the very different weights and sizes of footballs and baseballs. There are many successful quarterbacks who once pitched or played centerfield. There are many who never could master the arm slots of both sports. So, the decision belongs to two entities: Alex Malzone and Doug Nussmeirer.

Again, Dilfer is harmless and is attempting to provide help to others, but his advice is not guaranteed to be better or worse than other sages and quarterback developers. One scenario that coaches hate is an opposing viewpoint being in conflict with the current plan for development they have implemented.

This will not be the case with Malzone. He simply spent a few days with another in the growing community of quarterback gurus and will return to the direction of his high school coach, and later on Coach Nussmeirer. How much these coaches agree with Dilfer’s assessment and what “corrections” will be undertaken likely will not become common knowledge. There is enough to like about Malzone and his baseball throwing motion; enough that Coach Nussmeirer sought out a somewhat intense evaluation of Malzone.

June 29, 2013; Beaverton, OR, USA; Elite 11 coach Trent Dilfer looks on during the afternoon session of the Elite 11 at Nike World Headquarters. Mandatory Credit: Steve Dykes-USA TODAY Sports

June 29, 2013; Beaverton, OR, USA; Elite 11 coach Trent Dilfer looks on during the afternoon session of the Elite 11 at Nike World Headquarters. Mandatory Credit: Steve Dykes-USA TODAY Sports

As Dilfer pointed out, his baseball-like mechanics can be “overcome.” Or, Malzone may be allowed to work within his natural motion and have success. Changing a pitcher or quarterback’s natural motion can be risky. By the way, a natural motion is not defined as holding the ball unprotected below the waist and running around.

Something tells me that if Malzone were 6’ 4” he would have been on the recruiting radar sooner and would have ascended the star-gazers rating scale. At the end of next season it is hard not to view Alex Malzone as a consensus low four-star; he will be boosted by his Michigan commitment (to some extent this has already happened) and his exposure at the Elite 11. He will not ascend much higher, also due to the media exposure of his not being included as one of Dilfer’s final 11 disciples.

Oct 26, 2013; London, United Kingdom; Joe Montana throws a football into the crowd at the NFL Fan Rally at Trafalgar Square in advance of the International Series game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Jacksonville Jaguars. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Joe Montana was minimally a short-armer with limited velocity, and he used his knowledge and precision to obtain magnificent results. Not all quarterbacks have the pure fly-rod method of a Peyton Manning. Brady is perhaps the model of the short-armer, his success lies in a super quick short circle and a Fort Knox of intangibles.

Now Malzone has a very long way to go, but do not discount his potential, due to a guru making minimal comments about a change in his arm slot and/or delivery. Alex Malzone will have clear competition at Michigan; he knows that and so do the others.

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Written by GBMWolverine Staff — Doc4Blu

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Tags: Alex Malzone Football Joe Montana Michigan Football Michigan Wolverines Recruiting

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